Rajan Zaveri | Delhi’s E-waste
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Delhi’s E-waste

PHOTOS
Legal E-Waste
New Delhi: India: 2013
Mohammad Sabir has a license to collect ewaste so his business is legal, but is not allowed to dismantle or resell it. Here he stands in front of the office he has worked
out of for 25 years. His warehouse with all the ewaste he collects is in a different area.
Illegal E-Waste

New Delhi: India: 2013
Mohammad Salman Mansoori, 19, sits with his colleagues ages 16, 18 and 12, in their dismantling workspace, stripping hard drives for their steel. They are four among
as many as 80,000 people working in the dangerous and illegal trade of handling ewaste in Delhi.

Illegal E-Waste

New Delhi: India: 2013
Each component is stripped by hand and put into specific piles for reuse

Illegal E-Waste

New Delhi: India: 2013
Mansoori sat cross-legged on the floor, with three other boys -- aged 12, 16 and 18 – they make a couple of dollars a day for stripping about 1,000 components

Illegal E-Waste

New Delhi: India: 2013
Each component is stripped by hand and put into specific piles for reuse

Illegal E-Waste

New Delhi: India: 2013
As this 12 year old boy hammers a drive, tiny screws and shards of copper were flying. "These will be made into kitchen utensils"

Illegal E-Waste

New Delhi: India: 2013
Delhi's well-established e-waste scrap yards are some of the largest in Asia, a source of income for as many as 150,000 people

Illegal E-Waste

New Delhi: India: 2013
Delhi's well-established e-waste scrap yards are some of the largest in Asia, a source of income for as many as 150,000 people

Illegal E-Waste

New Delhi: India: 2013
Delhi recycles as much as 30,000 tonnes of printers, computers and other electronics scrap from all over the world every year.

Illegal E-Waste

New Delhi: India: 2013
Delhi recycles as much as 30,000 tonnes of printers, computers and other electronics scrap from all over the world every year.

Illegal E-Waste

New Delhi: India: 2013
Delhi recycles as much as 30,000 tonnes of printers, computers and other electronics scrap from all over the
world every year.

Illegal E-Waste

New Delhi: India: 2013
Workers are concerned because their workload has been dwindling. Delhi's pollution control officials have for the last couple of years tried to clamp down on the
dangerous and illegal trade of dismantling and reselling electronic waste within the capital.

Illegal E-Waste

New Delhi: India: 2013
Delhi recycles as much as 30,000 tonnes of printers, computers and other electronics scrap from all over the world every year.

Illegal E-Waste

New Delhi: India: 2013
Delhi recycles as much as 30,000 tonnes of printers, computers and other electronics scrap from all over the world every year.

Illegal E-Waste

New Delhi: India: 2013
Workers are concerned because their workload has been dwindling. Delhi's pollution control officials have for the last couple of years tried to clamp down on the
dangerous and illegal trade of dismantling and reselling electronic waste within the capital.

Illegal E-Waste

New Delhi: India: 2013
Workers are concerned because their workload has been dwindling. Delhi's pollution control officials have for the last couple of years tried to clamp down on the
dangerous and illegal trade of dismantling and reselling electronic waste within the capital.

STORY

E-waste refuses to ‘disappear’ from Delhi

For years, more than 100,000 people in Delhi have toiled in the city’s electronic scrapyards. Tons of printers, computers and other castaway electronics arrive here every day from all over the world. The workers take them apart and salvage the parts for reuse. The work is illegal. It’s also dangerous, as the components can be toxic.

 

Recently, however, the government has cracked down on these illegal factories. Delhi officials are licensing electronic waste sites that legitimately dispose of this toxic trash. The workers who have long taken the refuse apart by hand say the new system is working, but that also means their jobs are being taken away.

 

I photographed some of them at one of the city’s illegal e-waste sites before being chased off site.

 
 

 
 

For a more in-depth article featuring some of my images view Kamala Kelkar’s story on